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The Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) has issued guidance that virtual currencies are taxed like barter transactions, similar to the rules in the USA.

They also specify that virtual currencies can be traded like commodities, where any resulting gains or losses could be considered taxable income or capital. You can read about their bulletin (paragraphs 9 - 32) or see this guide to determine which applies to you. The difference is that business income is included in taxable income at 100%, whereas capital gains are included in taxable income at 50% (as in the US, charges, fees, and commissions can be deducted).

Accounting Methods

In terms of capital gains calculations, the CRA requires using Adjusted Cost Base (ACB). Your capital gains go onto your Schedule 3 Form. See here for an explanation of how ACB works. If you are classified as business income, then inventory methods can be used to track the income (FIFO or ACB). In this case, your business income would go on T2125 Statement of Business or Professional Activities.

Foreign Property

Additionally, when you hold specified foreign property greater than CAD 100,000 in value during any time during the year, you are required to fill out a T1135 – Foreign Income Verification Statement.

Superficial Loss

The CRA also has a superficial loss rule to prevent taking advantage of capital losses. We are working on building this into CoinTracker however would need to be calculated manually for the time being using the Capital Gains CSV CoinTracker provides.

Airdrops and Forks

For airdrops and hard forks, unlike the US where guidance is unclear, in Canada the cost basis is zero for these coins. Therefore when the coins are disposed the entire proceeds are considered capital gains (for individuals) or income (for businesses).

Mining

Mining is considered a business operation and therefore mined coins are considered inventory and business income rules apply. Any costs associated with mining (e.g. equipment, electricity, etc.) would need to be calculated on a per coin basis and then could be deducted against the proceeds.

TurboTax

If you choose to file your Canadian crypto taxes with TurboTax, unfortunately they do not currently support uploading cryptocurrency transaction files. Therefore here is how we have entered transactions into TurboTax Canada using the data from CoinTracker:

  1. In TurboTax, navigate to Income > Investments > Capital Gains and Capital Gains Deduction Profile
  2. Check the first box Sold stocks ... and Continue
  3. For "Type of capital property disposed of" enter Personal-use property
  4. For "# of units for shares or face value" enter the quantity of coins bought/sold. You can look this up in the cost basis CSV from the CoinTracker Tax page (after purchasing a tax plan). Note: make sure you are using the correct year's data for the year of return that you are filing (e.g. 2017)
  5. Leave "Corporation name and share class or name of issuer" and "Maturity date - bonds (dd/mm/yyyy)" blank
  6. For "Year of acquisition (yyyy)" enter the year that you purchased the coins that were disposed of for that taxable event
  7. For "Date of disposition (dd/mm)" enter the date that the coins were sold or traded
  8. For "Proceeds of disposition" enter the Proceeds amount from cost basis CSV
  9. For "Adjusted cost base" enter the Cost Basis amount from the cost basis CSV. Note: make sure you are using *Adjusted Cost Base* for your "Cost Basis Method" on the tax page for Canada
  10. For "Outlays and expenses" you can enter any fees or expenses you have incurred for your crypto transactions (coming soon to CoinTracker). If you did not have any or don't know what they were, you can leave this at 0.00
  11. Click "Enter New Dispositions" for each taxable event and then press "Done"

Note: entering one huge averaged transaction yields the same total capital gain as entering each transaction individually (but is not a complete record of each taxable event). If you choose to enter one huge averaged crypto transaction, you can find the numbers for Proceeds and Cost Basis on the top right side of the CoinTracker tax page (after purchasing a tax plan)

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